Graham Mooney, PhD

Associate Professor, History of Medicine; Associate Professor, Epidemiology; Director of Graduate Studies, HOM; Director of Online Program, HOM

443-287-6147

 

Institute of the History of Medicine
The Johns Hopkins University
1900 East Monument Street
Baltimore, MD 21205

Twitter: @histgeoghealth


Research Interests

History of public health nineteenth and twentieth centuries, UK and USA; infectious disease surveillance and control; historical geographies of health and medicine; historical epidemiology and demography.

Bio

My book Intrusive Interventions: Public Health, Domestic Space, and Infectious Disease Surveillance in England 1840-1914 (University of Rochester Press, 2015), examines the history of public health interventions such as infectious disease notification, institutional and domestic isolation, disinfection, and contact tracing.

I am currently working on two book projects. Harm City: Health and Injustice in Urban America is based on a class that I teach at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The book uses a case study of race and class politics in Baltimore to explore the fracturing of public health systems and policy in neo-liberal American cities. Spatial Histories of Modern Medicine: Using Space and Place to Understand the Past (under contract to Cambridge University Press) uses a series of historical examples, including homes, ambulances, and waiting rooms, to investigate how the characteristics of space and place influence healing practices, and how the practice of medicine produces particular kinds of place and space.

Adjunct appointment in the Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health

CV: https://jhusom.academia.edu/GrahamMooney


 

Publications

Books

Intrusive Interventions Book Cover Graham Mooney, Intrusive Interventions: Public Health, Domestic Space, and Infectious Disease Surveillance in England 1840-1914 (University of Rochester Press 2015). Read the Introduction.
Permeable Walls: Historical Perspectives on Hospital and Asylum Visiting Book Cover (co-edited with Jonathan Reinarz) Permeable Walls: Historical Perspectives on Hospital and Asylum Visiting (Clio Medica/Rodopi [now Brill], 2009).

 

Articles

Simon R. S. Szreter and Graham Mooney. ‘Scarlet fever and nineteenth‐century mortality trends: a reply to Romola Davenport.’ Economic History Review. Published online November 4, 2020. 10.1111/ehr.13042

Graham Mooney. ‘“A menace to the public health” — contact tracing and the limits of persuasion.’ New England Journal of Medicine, September 2, 2020. 10.1056/NEJMp2021887

Ayah Nuriddin, Graham Mooney and Alexandre White, ‘Reckoning with histories of medical racism and violence in the USA,’ The Lancet, Volume 396, Issue 10256, October 3, 2020), 949-951. 10.1016/S0140-6736(20)32032-8

Graham Mooney, ‘Washington and Welch talk about race: public health, history, and the politics of exclusion’, American Journal of Public Health, 105:7 (July 2015), 1317-1328. 10.2105/AJPH.2015.302636. This article was selected for a 2106 AJPH Paper of the Year Award.

(with Toke Aidt) ‘Voting suffrage and the political budget cycle: evidence from the London Metropolitan Boroughs, 1902-1937’, Journal of Public Economics, 112 (2014), 53-71. (Open Access, freely available). Also available here as CESifo Working Paper No. 4614 (January 2014).

‘The material consumptive: domesticating the tuberculosis patient in Edwardian England’, Journal of Historical Geography, 42:1 (2013), 152-166. (Open Access, freely available). ‘Highly Commended’ for the Journal of Historical Geography Prize, 2014.

‘Diagnostic spaces: workhouse, hospital and home in mid-Victorian London’, Social Science History, 30:3 (2009), 357-90.

‘Second opinions: infectious diseases and epidemiologic transition in Victorian Britain? Definitely’, Social History of Medicine, 20:3 (2007), 595-606.

 

Chapters

Jeremy A. Greene, Graham Mooney and Carolyn Sufrin, ‘The walking classroom and the community clinic: teaching social medicine beyond the medical school’. In Helena Hansen, Jonathan Metzl (eds.), Structural Competency in Mental Health and Medicine: A Case-Based Approach to Treating the Social Determinants of Health (Springer, 2019), 15-25

‘Historical demography and epidemiology: the meta-narrative challenge,’ in Mark Jackson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Medicine (Oxford University Press, 2011), 373-92.

(with Jonathan Reinarz) ‘Hospital and asylum visiting in historical perspective: themes and issues,’ in Graham Mooney and Jonathan Reinarz (eds), Permeable Walls: Historical Perspectives on Hospital and Asylum Visiting (Clio Medica/Rodopi, 2009).

‘Infection and citizenship: (not) visiting isolation hospitals in Victorian Britain,’ in Graham Mooney and Jonathan Reinarz (eds), Permeable Walls: Historical Perspectives on Hospital and Asylum Visiting (Clio Medica/Rodopi, 2009).

‘British public health and the problem of local demographic structure,’ in Susan Gross Solomon, Patrick Zylberman and Lion Murard (eds), Shifting Boundaries of Public Health: Europe in the Twentieth Century (Rochester, University of Rochester Press, 2008).

 

Other publications, presentations, and media

July 23, 2020, ‘From Casualty Room to A&E: History of a Hospital Space in the Twentieth Century’, Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, Scotland.

May 19, 2020, “How to Talk About Freedom During a Pandemic,” The Atlantic.

April 9, 2020, “Hospital Visiting in Epidemics: An Old Debate Reopened,” History & Policy.

March 18, 2020, “Epidemics, Elites, and Public Health,” Against the Grain, KPFA 94.1.

‘Public health and primary care: Maryland’s track record of innovation,’ Epidemic Proportions, 10 (2013), 51-54. (Freely available here).

 

Teaching

ME 150.728 Healing Spaces: Historical Geographies of Medical Practice (View an introduction here.)

SPH 550.609.01 Life and death in Charm City: Histories of Public Health in Baltimore, 1750 to the present (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Excellence in Teaching, 2013, 2014)

SPH 550.605.81 History of Modern Public Health (Online Class. View an introduction here.)